COMMUTE TIMES SOAR AS MCCORMACK AND TUDGE FAIL TO BUST CONGESTION

CATHERINE KING MP.
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1 month ago
COMMUTE TIMES SOAR AS MCCORMACK AND TUDGE FAIL TO BUST CONGESTION
CATHERINE KING MP
Australians are spending on average 4.5 hours a week getting to and from work — a rise of 23 per cent since 2002.
 
The data revealed in the latest Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, shows that average weekly travel times to and from work rose from 3.7 hours to 4.5 hours.
 
While Australians are struggling with ever-increasing commute times the Morrison Government refuses to bring the forward infrastructure investment needed to bust congestion.
 
Commuters in Sydney are experiencing a massive 71 minute average journey to and from work each day, while Melbournians are spending an average of 65 minutes on their commute. 
 
Australians living outside our capital cities fare no better, with huge blowouts in average daily commute times across the regions.
 
More Australians are facing longer commutes, with 1 in 6 Australians travelling more than two hours to and from work, up from 1 in 8 in 2002.
 
The HILDA survey notes longer commute times can reduce worker wellbeing through diminished job satisfaction and flexibility between work and non-work commitments.
 
Most importantly long commutes can lead to negative family outcomes, preventing parents from spending more time with their families. 27 percent of fathers with two children had commutes greater than two hours.
 
It’s time for Scott Morrison’s two Ministers for Infrastructure – Michael McCormack and Alan Tudge – to bring forward investment in infrastructure projects to stimulate the Australian economy and actually bust congestion, not just talk about it.
 
After talking a big game on infrastructure during the election campaign, Australians are rightly concerned by McCormack and Tudge’s repeated refusals to bring forward infrastructure investment to stimulate a sluggish economy and bust congestion. 
 
Less than 30 percent of Scott Morrison’s so-called $100 billion 10 year infrastructure program is budgeted for the next four years.
 
This follows the dismal record of spending $5.1 billion less on infrastructure than promised over its first six years.
 
It’s time for McCormack and Tudge to stop talking and get moving on infrastructure - Australians can’t afford to wait any longer.
 
Infrastructure Regional Development